Apr 21, 2021  
2018-2019 Supplemental Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Supplemental Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Management Information Systems

  
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    MIS 4322 - Global Electronic Commerce

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students will be introduced to the theory and practice of using the Internet for commercial activities that reach beyond national borders. Software, security, payment systems, and the business models used by international electronic businesses are covered. Legal, regulatory, ethical, and cultural issues related to these businesses are also addressed.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 1380  
  
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    MIS 4330 - Current Topics in Project Management

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This is an advanced level course in Project Management. It examines complexity and uncertainty within the Project Management domain and its life cycles. Current alternative approaches to project management that has been adopted by organizations or in wide use will be taught. Students will build projects using specialized project tools like Microsoft Project as well as apply skills learned about the current methodologies such as, but not limited to Agile, Lean and Scrum to developing such projects.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 3320   - Project Management; (grade of “C-” or better)
  
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    MIS 4340 - Web System Development

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students design and develop data-driven e- commerce systems.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 2312 , MIS 3340 , MIS 3380  
  
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    MIS 4360 - Information Resources Management: Basic Components and Considerations

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is concerned with managing the resources required to produce information in complex organizations. Typically, critical analysis of current reading material in the information technology area is emphasized.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 3330 , MIS 3380  
  
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    MIS 4380 - Advanced Management of Information Systems

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students are required to address one or more advanced or emerging issues in information systems management as part of the overall curriculum objective—enhancement of student knowledge and understanding of basic information system design, operations, and management concerns.
    Pre-requisite(s): MIS 3380  
  
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    MIS 4391 - MIS Internship

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A business internship (ACC 3391, ACC 4391, BUA 3391, BUA 4391, ECO 3391, ECO 4391, FIN 3391, FIN 4391, MIS 3391, MIS 4391, MGT 3391, MGT 4391, MKT 3391, MKT 4391) is defined as an academically-sponsored career-related work experience for which projects, research papers, presentations, reflective journals, and/or evaluations will be required by faculty for reporting/grading purposes. Business internships may be paid or unpaid opportunities. Students may take a maximum of six (6) credit hours of business internships regardless of prefix during matriculation, i.e., two different experiences. An internship requires a minimum of 120 contact hours per semester. Internships are counted as elective credit and cannot be substituted for required courses.
    Pre-requisite(s): ACC 3391 , BUA 3391 , ECO 3391 , FIN 3391 , MIS 3391 , MGT 3391 , or MGT 4391 ; good academic standing with no violations of the academic integrity code; grade-point average of 2.50 or higher.

Marketing

  
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    MKT 2331 - Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course includes a study of the activities and problems of distribution and their influence upon business policies. Consideration is given to the marketing of consumer and industrial goods, sales promotion, price determination and regulatory issues that influence marketing practices.
    Pre-requisite(s): BCO 2311   or a written communications course
    Student Learning Outcome: Oral Communication
    Latest Update(s) Approved by Academic Standards and Curriculum: February 21, 2017
  
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    MKT 3302 - Business Plan Foundations

    Credits: 3 Hrs
    This course develops the essential skills necessary to create a new entity or refine a current business concept for which limited service or product delivery has been previously accomplished. Course emphasizes the necessity and methods to generate research-based detailed information leading to the preparation of a pro forma business plan. Elements include the executive summary, the vision and mission statements, the branding strategy, the situational analysis, the core benefit proposition, and its accompanying marketing plan, the managerial team structure, the financials, and the presentation to potential investors or other stakeholders. Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing or Consent of Instructor.
  
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    MKT 3303 - Fundamentals of Nonprofit Marketing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course examines the role and application of fundraising approaches in nonprofit settings. It provides a conceptual understanding of the fundraising process, and illustrates how marketing strategies and technology can help a nonprofit organization in raising funds and inspiring volunteer participation. Through course reading materials, guest speakers, and group projects, students gain a broad understanding of successful fundraising utilizing a marketing orientation as changes in society and technology require new and creative strategies. They gain a working understanding of marketing research and communication methods, and learn how to apply them to nonprofit organizations. They analyze the broader external environment and identify key publics and competitors. These competencies may be synthesized in an actual fundraising plan for a nonprofit organization.
  
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    MKT 3305 - Entrepreneurial Marketing

    Credits: 3 Hrs
    Study of the analytic tools and methods of modern marketing to profitably recognize and accommodate potential customer segments. The course addresses the marketing mix of product, price, place, and promotion from the pragmatic constraints of limited resources during the early stages of starting up. Critical decisions must be based on relevant marketing research designed to identify target market(s), a thorough competitive analysis (including, but not limited to SWOT), new online media tools, and financing requirements. Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing or Consent of Instructor.
  
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    MKT 3332 - Principles of Retailing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is an analytical approach to the management of retailing and wholesaling institutions. Topics covered include: analysis of market structure, design of marketing and merchandising strategy, choice of distribution channels and location decisions.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 2331  
  
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    MKT 3334 - Integrated Marketing Communications

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course takes a holistic approach to plan, integrate and implement the various forms of marketing communications toward the goal of enhancing brand equity. It covers different aspects of Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) program: advertising management in traditional and new media, consumer and trade-oriented sales promotions, public relations, point of purchase communication, sponsorships, and examination of several successful IMC campaigns.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 2331  
  
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    MKT 3335 - Consumer and Organizational Buyer Behavior

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a managerial approach which introduces basic concepts, principles and theories in consumer behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to the following: consumer decision process, psychological foundations, social and cultural influence, organizational buyer behavior and consumerism.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 2331  
  
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    MKT 3391 - Marketing Internship

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A business internship (ACC 3391, ACC 4391, BUA 4391, ECO 3391, ECO 4391, FIN 3391, FIN 4391, MGT 3391, MGT 4391, MIS 3391, MIS 4391, MKT 3391, MKT 4391) is defined as an academically-sponsored career-related work experience for which projects, research papers, presentations, reflective journals, and/or evaluations will be required by faculty for reporting/grading purposes. Business internships may be unpaid opportunities and must be for academic credit. Students may take a maximum of six (6) credit hours of business internships regardless of prefix during matriculation, i.e., two different experiences. An internship requires a minimum of 300 contact hours per semester. Internship are counted as elective credit and cannot be substituted for required courses. 
    Pre-requisite(s): Junior standing, ACC 3391 , ACC 2317 , BCO 2311  or another Level II written communications course ECO 2311  and ECO 2312  , good academic standing with no violations of the acadmic intergrity code, grade-point average of 2.50 or higher.
  
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    MKT 4302 - Selling and Sales Management

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a theoretical and applied approach to sales management including, but not limited to, the study of: personal selling and market strategy; planning and organization of the sales effort; recruitment, motivation, evaluation and supervision of sales personnel; and control of the sales program.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 2331  
  
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    MKT 4370 - Services Marketing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is an exploration of the similarities and differences between product and service marketing. It covers the problems and issues service marketers face, along with the tools and techniques, they utilize to resolve them. The major objective of this course is to acquaint the students to the uniqueness of the services characteristics and their marketing implications. The intent of the course is to discuss, measure, and analyze several facets in the area of services marketing essential for the success of a service sector firm.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 2331  
  
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    MKT 4372 - Social Media Marketing

    Credits: 3 Hrs
    Social media marketing is changing the way companies of all sizes communicate with their customers. In the same way that companies have used traditional media, marketers use social media to reach their customers efficiently and effectively. However, social media has changed communication from a one-way process to a two-way conversation. This course will cover the use of social media applications such as blogging, online communities, social networking, WIKIs, rapid sharing systems, podcasting, and search engine marketing in marketing management. Prerequisite(s): MKT 3331.
  
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    MKT 4376 - Marketing Research

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course will examine a variety of research methods and procedures used to conduct studies leading to marketing decisions. Emphasis is placed on: developing the student’s problem ability to formulate a management problem into a feasible research question, providing participants with a workable knowledge of the concepts and methods of marketing research; increasing the students’ awareness of potential biases and limitations of typical kinds of research data and techniques; and familiarizing students with various approaches to analyzing market structures, buyer behavior, and potential demand for new products and services.
    Pre-requisite(s): QBA 2325, MKT 3331, MKT 3335, QBA 3370
  
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    MKT 4379 - International Marketing

    Credits: 3 hrs


    This course is a study of international marketing opportunities and principles and marketing tools as a means of adapting the individual domestic business line and its marketing methods to the international environment. Emphasis is placed on international marketing environments including economic, cultural, political, and social forces influencing marketing programs. Critical international marketing decisions under each entry modes such as exporting, contractual agreements, and direct investment, nd standardization versus adaptation of marketing programs in foreign and global markets will be examined. Global consumers and global brands are also examined.

     
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 3331, MGT 3350

  
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    MKT 4380 - Marketing Strategy

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a study of effective marketing decision-making. It is an extension of Marketing 3331 with detailed consideration given to techniques of constructing marketing policy and decision making processes. Problems and case studies form the basis for discussion.
    Pre-requisite(s): MKT 4376.
  
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    MKT 4391 - Marketing Internship

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A business internship (ACC 3391, ACC 4391, BUA 4391, ECO 3391, ECO 4391, FIN 3391, FIN 4391, MGT 3391, MGT 4391, MIS 3391, MIS 4391, MKT 3391, MKT 4391) is defined as an academically-sponsored career-related work experience for which projects, research papers, presentations, reflective journals, and/or evaluations will be required by faculty for reporting/grading purposes. Business internships may be unpaid opportunities and must be for academic credit. Students may take a maximum of six (6) credit hours of business internships regardless of prefix during matriculation, i.e., two different experiences. An internship requires a minimum of 300 contact hours per semester. Internship are counted as elective credit and cannot be substituted for required courses. 
    Pre-requisite(s): ACC 3391 , BUA 3391 , ECO 3391 , FIN 3391 , MGT 3391 , MIS 3391 , MKT 3391 , good academic standing with no violations of the acadmic intergrity code, grade-point average of 2.50 or higher.

Mass Communications

  
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    MCM 1301 - Introduction to Human Communication Theory

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Unknown stories, unheard stories, untellable stories; here are some ideas you may learn about in this course. Stories help communicators make sense of a situation. This course is open to all students who are interested in real-life application of communication theory and how daily occurences make sense in an ever-changing communication environment.
    General Education Designation: Yes
    Student Learning Outcome: Critical Reading
    Area of Knowledge: Social and Behavioral Science
    Latest Update(s) Approved by Academic Standards and Curriculum: November 19, 2013
  
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    MCM 2325 - Introduction to Mass Communications

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course provides a survey of the role, structure and functions of the mass media in contemporary society.  It promotes awareness of the social, cultural, political and technological aspects of mass communications.  It also provides an introduction to basic communication theory, research and aesthetics.
  
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    MCM 2341 - Digital Convergence

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students blend text, sounds, graphics and images to produce, edit and create new media projects.  Exploring and demonstrating how traditional media has digitally converged with online media for the purpose of disseminating information in the communication and media industry is a primary focus of this course.  Relevant information to cultural and societal issues will dominate the type of messages disseminated while an understanding about the impact multmedia platforms create on the content and delivery to their audiences is examined.
  
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    MCM 3215 - Journalism Practicum

    Credits: 2 hrs
    A lecture and laboratory course in which students are given fundamental instructions to produce print and online newspapers. Students are encouraged to assist the operations of the campus student operated newspaper, The News Argus. Students may assume the real-world duties and responsibilities of junior staff members (such as but not limited to reporters, photographers, copy editors, videographers, features writers, graphics, etc.) of the student-operated newspaper, The News Argus (print and online editions). Junior student staff members are provided with fundamental instruction about various phases of newspaper production and Argus video productions. Students are encouraged to submit their published work to collegiate journalism competitions. Students are required to develop an e-portfolio.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  or Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 3301 - Law and Ethics of Mass Communications

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course offers an overview of legal limitations and privileges affecting the functions of print and electronic media including libel, obscenity, freedom of expression and the right to privacy. Also considered are advertising and antitrust regulations, copyright, access to the press, and broadcast rules and regulations.
  
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    MCM 3305 - Mass Media Management

    Credits: 3 hrs
    The course content includes organizational structure of online print and electronic media organizations as they relate to decision making for personnel, budget, and equipment, including adherence to laws and regulations. Roles of specific personnel are analyzed.
  
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    MCM 3308 - Journalism Language, Style, and Literacy

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course lays the foundation for the writing of news, feature, analysis, and opinion articles. It covers the elements and rules of English and mass media writing, as well as the analysis and critique of the content of news and information media.
  
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    MCM 3311 - Studio Production

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory course. Students develop and create studio video productions. They are responsible for all tasks, including writing, presentation, directing, graphics, audio, and camera operation. This is a hands-on production class that allows students to gain knowledge and experience in all phases of studio television production for broadcast and online video operations.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 2341  and MCM 3325  
  
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    MCM 3312 - Copy Editing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This is course focuses on related skills including: grammar and vocabulary; AP news style; effective story organization; locating and eliminating wordiness, redundancies and holes; accuracy; fact-checking. Instruction includes headline writing, caption/cutline writing, and all useful elements a media practitioner needs to be aware of. Course also provides introduction to newspaper design (InDesign labs).
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  or Instructor permission.
  
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    MCM 3320 - Intercultural Communication

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course serves as an introduction to the field of intercultural communication by examining the practical application of theory and research.  The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the communication process across cultural boundaries in a variety of contexts.  The course focuses on challenges and issues important to the understanding of people of different racial, ethnic, national and cultural backgrounds in the US and abroad.  This course is the study of the relationship between culture and communication.  Includes problems in the practice of intercultural communication.
    General Education Designation: Yes
    Student Learning Outcome: Oral Communication
    Area of Knowledge: Foreign Language and Culture
    Curricular Theme: Diversity
  
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    MCM 3321 - Media Presentation

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course addresses the principles, theory, and practice in camera presence and audio microphone use for traditional and new media with special attention to the development of presentation skills.
  
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    MCM 3325 - Media Writing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course introduces students to writing across Media Writing. Media Writings include news and feature stories for print and broadcast; advertising and public relations copy; and digital electronic media scriptwriting. The course also surveys news styles, policy, ethics and legal issues associated with delivering news and entertainment in diverse forms.
  
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    MCM 3340 - News Reporting and Writing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This lecture course is designed to teach students who possess little or no practical journalism experience the basics of gathering, reporting and writing news, for print and online media. Course topics include: leads, news style, newsworthiness, inverted pyramid, interviewing; handling quotations and attributions; using social media or press releases; how to become discerning news consumers.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3308  or Instructor permission.
  
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    MCM 3342 - Mass, Communications and Culture

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This is a General Education course which satisfies Information Literacy student learning outcome requirement. Media, Communication and Culture provides an overview of the role, structure and functions of mass media in contemporary society.  The course also promotes awareness of the social, economic, cultural, political and technological aspects of mass communications along with an introduction to basic theory, business strategies and aesthetics. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of media and audience relationships, and the role of the media in shaping public opinion.
    General Education Designation: Yes
    Student Learning Outcome: Information Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Social and Behavioral Science
    Curricular Theme: Globalization
    Latest Update(s) Approved by Academic Standards and Curriculum: November 19, 2013
  
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    MCM 3345 - Communicating for Social Justice

    Credits: 3 hrs
    In this course, students will explore social justice issues and then advocate for positive change through communication activism. Strategic methods of communication advocacy for social justice and change will be examined. Students will develop and execute a communication theories, social media tools, and media production techniques to influence public discourse.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 1301  or permission of the instructor
    Student Learning Outcome: Oral Communication
    Area of Knowledge: Social/Behavioral Science
    Latest Update(s) Approved by Academic Standards and Curriculum: September 4, 2018
    Effective Date: January 2019
  
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    MCM 3355 - Topics in Communication and Media Studies

    Credits: 3-6 hrs
    This course is a critical study of a topic or area not covered in the current departmental curriculum.  The content and emphasis may vary at teach offering.  Topic announcements will ordinarily be made during the preceding semester.  Students may enroll in this couse for a maximum of 6 credit hours toward the major. 
    Pre-requisite(s): junior status and completion of at least 3 hours in the CMS Core
  
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    MCM 3360 - Public Affairs Reporting

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed to improve students’ writing and reporting skills and acquaint them with government agencies and other public institutions. It encompasses the institutions and issues that involve public life (e.g., religion, business, the arts, environment, public health) and will increase student confidence in dealing with public officials. Students are encouraged to submit their stories (stories broadly defined to include the traditional text article, as well as photography, audio, video, graphics, links) to WSSU student media for publication, broadcast, and/or new media consideration.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  and MCM 4316  or Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 3366 - Advanced Video Directing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory focused on the role and responsibilities of the director.  This is a hands-on production class that allows students to gain knowledge and experience in all phases of directing a video production. Topics covered included directing multi-camera and single camera shows, preproduction planning, post production, casting, writing, budgeting, and working in a collaborative environment. Students focus on understanding all elements involved in creating a director’s vision. Students will develop skills in lighting, storyboarding, framing, using depth of field, and editing to create a vision.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3311  and MCM 3370  
  
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    MCM 3367 - Advanced Video Editing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory focused on the role and responsibilities of the editor. This is a hands-on production class that allows students to gain knowledge and experience in all phases of editing a video production.  Topics covered included non-linear digital editing, DVD authoring, media management, multi-camera editing, and digital special effects.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3311  and MCM 3370  
  
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    MCM 3368 - Advanced Video Production

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory focused on working within a collaborative environment to produce digital content. This is a hands-on production class that allows students to gain knowledge and experience in all phases of a video production. Topics covered included preproduction planning, post production planning, casting, writing, producing, and working in a collaborative environment.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3311  and MCM 3370  
  
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    MCM 3369 - Mass Communications General Internship

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed to help students combine curriculum with on-the-job learning experiences.  The course provides an opportunity to explore media options for career choices for undecided communication and media students. Interns are required to work 90 hours at the site for a minimum of seven weeks.
    Pre-requisite(s): Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 3370 - Field Production

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory focused on the creation and production of video content outside a studio environment. This is a hands-on production class that allows students to gain knowledge and experience in a variety of field production projects. Topics covered included single camera operation, composition, set design, field lighting, audio, directing, writing, editing, and producing. Students develop, shoot and edit field productions. They are responsible for all tasks, including image and sound acquisition, presentation, and editing.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3325  
  
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    MCM 3380 - News Editing & Design

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This advanced course features lectures and practical experiences in copy editing and designing newspapers and similar publications.  Instruction will provide essentials of pagination, copy editing, headline writing, typography, design, using art (photos and illustrations). Students will be instructed how to use infographics, multimedia clips in print and online to complement media content. Students are required to develop an e-portfolio.
  
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    MCM 4093 - Mass Communications Internship

    Credits: 3 hrs
    The internship is a field-based hands-on opportunity for CMS majors to apply, demonstrate, learn, and improve their media skills in “real media-related” settings where they can meet and network with professionals. Student interns are required to work at least 150 hours during 10 consecutive weeks at the site. Student interns must be supervised as they engage in meaningful media related tasks and assignments that contribute to their understanding of how media organizations operate. Students find their own placements. However, the Department of Communication and Media Studies will assist students with locating opportunities. Students are required to develop an e-portfolio.
    Pre-requisite(s): Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 4115 - Advanced Journalism Practicum

    Credits: 1 hr
    An advanced lecture and laboratory course in which students are given fundamental instructions to produce print and online newspapers. Students are encouraged to assist the operations of the campus student operated newspaper, The News Argus. Students may assume the real-world duties and responsibilities of junior staff members (such as but not limited to reporters, photographers, copy editors, videographers, features writers, graphics, etc.) of the student-operated newspaper, The News Argus (print and online editions). Junior student staff members are provided with fundamental instruction about various phases of newspaper production and Argus video productions. Students are encouraged to submit their published work to collegiate journalism competitions. Students are required to develop an e-portfolio.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  or Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 4309 - Feature Writing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    In this course students write news stories without using the inverted pyramid. Feature writing offers students the chance to explore subjects more creatively and more in-depth. It requires students/writers to take risks and be imaginative and unique, while adhering to the rules of grammar and journalism style.  Students are required to use good research and information gathering techniques so they can pitch and develop provocative story ideas – necessary for all features. Students are encouraged to pitch/submit feature ideas and stories to WSSU student media for publication, broadcast, and/or new media consideration. 
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  or Instructor permission.
  
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    MCM 4312 - Mass Media Criticism

    Credits: 3 hrs
    In this course, media content is analyzed and critiqued from various perspectives using different methodologies including semiotics, psychoanalytical and sociological approaches. Media content is critiqued and analyzed in light of new developments in digital technology, advertising, audience formation, dissemination channels and effects research findings.
  
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    MCM 4316 - Critical and Persuasive Writing for Mass Media

    Credits: 3 hrs
    In this seminar-lecture course, students apply the foundations of news gathering and writing to learn and practice the fundamentals of opinion (critical and persuasive) writing for print and electronic media. The course covers a variety of opinion pieces including personal columns, editorials and reviews. Students will be trained to use legitimate sources to justify personal opinions and present them in a credible and newsworthy manner. Students will learn these aspects of journalism through participating in weekly classroom seminars, practical writing assignments and social media activities. Students are encouraged to pitch/submit their writings to WSSU student media for publication, broadcast, and/or new media consideration. 
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3340  
  
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    MCM 4321 - International Communications

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This lecture-seminar course surveys various media systems across the globe and examines diverse issues, theories, concepts, history and research in the field of international communications. Students learn about international communication concepts like the free flow of information, cultural homogenization, cultural hybridization, public diplomacy, propaganda, the CNN-effect, media bias and framing that affect communications between nations and cultures in this today’s information age, and in times of rapid globalization and digital convergence.
  
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    MCM 4322 - Minorities and Media

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course focuses on the role of the mass media in depicting, promoting, and influencing the lives of minorities in their various communities.
  
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    MCM 4325 - Communication Senior Seminar Capstone

    Credits: 3 hrs.
    In this course graduating seniors will synthesize their communication and media experience by reflecting on courses related to their field of work and scholarly focus. This capstone experience will allow students to explore substantive areas of scholarship and creative work within their major. Students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate and create knowledge within their discipline through research and production. The capstone course will also provide students with the opportunity to integrate, assimilate and compare knowledge gained from their major area with those in the liberal arts program. In this conclusive course, students will create a final project of their own design or a research paper under the guidance of a faculty member.
    Pre-requisite(s): Senior majors only
  
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    MCM 4346 - Independent Study

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students complete an audio-video project, a research paper or a project in consultation with supervising faculty. This course cannot be used to replace required courses in the program. 
    Pre-requisite(s): Instructor permission
  
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    MCM 4351 - Broadcast Marketing

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students learn strategies and tactics of marketing, selling, and promoting broadcast media organizations and their products and services. Appropriate research methods for targeting relevant demographic groups will be identified. Also, a comparative analysis of online media organizations and services will be examined.
  
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    MCM 4371 - Electronic Media Practicum

    Credits: 3 hrs
    A lecture-laboratory focused on working within a collaborative environment to produce digital content for broadcast. This is a hands-on production class that allows students to increase their knowledge and experience in all phases of a video production by applying the skills learned in earlier production courses. Students gain advanced practical experience in producing a digital media portfolio for the web.
    Pre-requisite(s): MCM 3311  and MCM 3370  

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 1103 - Freshman Seminar

    Credits: 1 hr
    This course is designed to provide entering freshmen and new students with an orientation to the university, its traditions, its program offerings, and its academic requirements and regulations. The focus is on adaptation to college life, problem solving skills, and critical thinking skills including effective study and test taking methods. This course will also provide an orientation to the Department of Mathematics, its various degree paths, and the nature of mathematical reasoning.
  
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    MAT 1306 - Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed for students with limited proficiency in elementary algebra. Topics include signed number operations, simplifying algebraic expressions, exponents, polynomials, equations and inequalities, word problems, and factoring. Requirements: All students scoring below a given level on the mathematics placement examination must enroll in this course. Students enrolled in this course receive a grade of P or F. Credit for this course is not counted towards the total hours needed for graduation.
  
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    MAT 1311 - College Algebra

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course covers topics in applied algebra. Topics include a review of factoring, algebraic fractions, rational exponents, radicals, first-degree linear equations and graphs, quadratic equations, first-degree inequalities, and linear systems of equations.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1306   or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination given by the university. This course may not be used as an approved elective by mathematics majors.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 1312 - Pre-Calculus I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course introduces techniques for solving inequalities involving absolute value, polynomials, and rational expressions. Included are discussions of functions and their graphs for linear, quadratic, and general polynomials, rational functions, exponentials, and logarithms. General graphing techniques and the conics are also discussed.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1311   or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 1313 - Pre-Calculus II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course, a continuation of MAT 1312  , helps to prepare a student for Calculus I. The following are among the topics studied: trigonometric functions and identities, solutions of trigonometric equations and triangles, graphs of the trigonometric functions, and verbal problems involving applications of trigonometric functions. Also included are sequences, series and mathematical induction.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1312  or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement test.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 1323 - Topics in Contemporary Math

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course serves as the core requirement for non-STEM majors. Topics include basic algebraic concepts, sets, statistics, probability, mathematics of finance, and problem solving.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1306   or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination given by the university. This course may not be used as an approved elective for mathematics majors.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 1325 - Principles of Math I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed for students who will be teaching mathematics from kindergarten to the ninth grade. The course will cover exercises and problem solving in major topics such as number sense and algebra. Emphasis will be placed on the why and when, as well as the how. Hopefully, this course will help prepare students for the mathematics part of the ETS Praxis Core Exam.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1306   or satisfactory score on the placement examination or permission of Instructor. Course will not be counted for mathematics minor or mathematics/mathematics education majors.
  
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    MAT 1326 - Principles of Math II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed for students who will be teaching mathematics from kindergarten to the ninth grade. The course will cover exercises and problem solving in major topics such as geometry, probability, and statistics. Emphasis will be placed on the why and when, as well as the how. Hopefully, this course will help prepare students for the mathematics part of ETS Praxis Core Exam.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1325  or satisfactory score on the placement examination or permission of Instructor. Course will not be counted for mathematics minor or mathematics/mathematics education majors.
  
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    MAT 1401 - Precalculus and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4 hrs
    This is a one-semester accelerated precalculus for highly prepared students course aimed at preparing students for the study of Calculus. Students will study real numbers, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trig functions and graphs, and analytic geometry. By the end of the semester, students will be able to analyze real world problems by using mathematical models and use appropriate techniques for solving various types of equations. Student will not receive credit for this course and MAT 1312  and MAT 1313 .
    Pre-requisite(s): Appropriate score on a Calculus readiness test or/and permission of Instructor.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 2260 - Pre-Calculus Review Seminar

    Credits: 2-6 hrs
    This course includes a review of topics covered in precalculus courses. The course provides the opportunity for students preparing for licensure and proficiency examinations to review course content and to improve test-taking skills. Credit for this course is not counted towards the total hours needed for graduation. The course may be taken more than once.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1313   or approval from the instructor.
    Grade: Pass/Fail
  
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    MAT 2301 - Introduction to Computer Algebra Systems

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course presents a brief introduction to the software and hardware being used. Included will be work with one or more computer algebra systems, such as Maple, Derive or Mathematica. Time will be spent not only learning to use the software, but using experimentation and discovery to better understand mathematical concepts. Some topics addressed are solutions of equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, and other pre-calculus and calculus topics.
  
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    MAT 2316 - Linear Algebra

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course presents systems of linear equations and matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations and their matrix representations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and some applications.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
  
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    MAT 2317 - Calculus I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is the first of four sequential semester courses, which addresses calculus for mathematics, science and engineering majors. The course examines functions, graphs, limits and derivatives, and rules of differentiation. This includes differentiation of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions, application of differentiation and the use of computational tools.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1313   or advanced placement; This course will not count with MAT 2333 .
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 2318 - Calculus II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is the second of four sequential semester courses, which addresses calculus for mathematics, science and engineering majors. The course examines techniques and applications of the integral calculus. Topics include the fundamental theorem of calculus, integrals and anti-derivatives of elementary functions, techniques of symbolic and numerical integration, application to calculation of areas and volumes of regions bounded by graphs of functions, and elementary differential equations with applications such as exponential growth and decay.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 2321 - Foundations of Modern Mathematics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed for mathematics majors as an introduction to mathematical principles and reasoning. It gives an introduction to the discipline of mathematics emphasizing deductive arguments and the development of analytical skills needed in understanding and building mathematical arguments. The content will include an introduction to logic and methods of proof and takes a look at functions and the ?-? definition of continuity. The course also examines the algebraic and topological properties of R and introduces metric spaces.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
  
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    MAT 2326 - Elementary Statistics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course intends to provide a basis for studying specialized statistical methods within the major fields of most students. Therefore, the main function of this course is to introduce the ideas of central tendency, variability, uncertainty, and some statistical methods for drawing inference from observed data. This course will enable each student to use statistics as a tool in the decision making process and to cultivate in each student an appreciation for the role of statistics in society.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Reasoning; The elementary statistics courses offered by other departments, PSY 2326  , SOC 2326  , and GER 2326  are also SLO: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic.; The elementary statistics courses offered by other departments, PSY 2326, SOC 2326, and GER 2326 can be used to satisfy the AK: Mathematics and Quantitative Logic.
    Cross-listed as SOC 2326   and PSY 2326  
  
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    MAT 2333 - Calculus for Business Majors

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course includes a brief review of the concepts of functions and combinations of functions. It also covers the basic concepts of differential and integral calculus and its applications. Special attention is given to problems in business and economics.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1312   or placement.
    Student Learning Outcome: Quantitative Literacy
    Area of Knowledge: Mathematics & Quantitative Logic
  
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    MAT 2337 - Discrete Mathematics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Topics include mathematical logic, Boolean algebra and computer logic, proof techniques, set theory, combinatorics, finite state machines, and complexity of algorithms.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1313  
  
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    MAT 3260 - Mathematics Review Seminar

    Credits: 2-6 hrs
    This course includes a review of topics covered in core mathematics courses for majors. The course provides the opportunity for students preparing for licensure and proficiency examinations to review course content and to improve test-taking skills. Credit for this course is not counted towards the total hours needed for graduation.
    Note(s): The course may be taken more than once.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2316  ,MAT 3316  , MAT 3341  , or approval from the instructor.
    Grade: Pass/Fail.
  
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    MAT 3310 - Probability and Statistics I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is designed to give an introduction to set theory and probability theory and to the concept of random variables, both discrete and continuous. Consideration is given to a discussion of several standard types of distributions.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317   and MAT 2326  
  
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    MAT 3311 - Probability and Statistics II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a continuation of MAT 3310 . Treatment is given to random sampling and classical statistical inference, especially point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, general linear models, Bayesian methods, and an introduction to least squares.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3310  
  
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    MAT 3312 - Biostatistics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course covers topics in both probability and statistics including: probability function and its properties, discrete and continuous random variables and their probability distributions, data description and their presentation, hypothesis testing, decision making and experimental design. Data will be used from the areas of biology, psychology, and neuroscience with appropriate software. Use of computer is a requirement. This course is for sophomore/junior level students with major or minor in an area of life science.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 1312   and BIO 1315  (Introduction to Biotechnology).
  
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    MAT 3316 - Calculus III

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is the third of four sequential semester courses, which addresses calculus for mathematics, science and engineering majors. Topics include sequences, infinite series, power series, Taylor’s theorem, conic sections, parametric equations, the polar coordinate system, and vectors and the geometry of space.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2318 
  
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    MAT 3317 - Calculus IV

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is the fourth of four sequential semester courses which addresses calculus for mathematics, science and engineering majors. Course examines the functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, directional derivatives, maxima and minima, multiple integration, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorems, Stokes’ Theorem, applications and the use of computational tools.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3316  
  
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    MAT 3318 - Introduction to Biomathematics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Population Dynamics (Discrete and continuous models, Logistic model, Equilibrium States), epidemiology (SIS/SIR Models), Quantitative genetics and statistics. Additional topics may be selected from topics covering mathematical applications in endocrinology, ligand binding, hormone pulsatility, risk analysis in diabetes and neonatal infections, circadian rhythms, and gene chip analysis.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  , MAT 2318 
  
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    MAT 3320 - Introduction to Number Theory

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Topics covered in this course include divisibility properties of the integers, primes, congruences, diophantine equations, and primitive roots.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
  
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    MAT 3326 - Geometry

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course presents Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry from a modern perspective. Topics include congruence, parallelism, similarity, measurements, constructions, solid geometry, ratio, proportion, the parallel postulate, and an overview of non- Euclidean geometries. Direct and indirect proofs will also be studied.
  
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    MAT 3340 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course covers theory and application of algorithms for numerical computation, approximation, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of linear and ordinary differential equations.
    Pre-requisite(s): CSC 1311   and MAT 2316 .
    Cross-listed as CSC 3340  .
  
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    MAT 3341 - Algebraic Structures I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course introduces the basic algebraic properties of groups, rings, and fields.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2316   and MAT 2337  .
    Cross-listed as CSC 3341  .
  
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    MAT 3350 - Linear Programming

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course develops the techniques used in linear programming such as the simplex method and the duality method. Linear programming techniques will be applied in the solution of transportation problems, industrial problems and problems in economic theory.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2316  and CSC 1311 .
  
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    MAT 3356 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1-6 hrs
    This course provides an opportunity for mathematics majors at the junior and senior level to work on an independent project with the guidance of a faculty member. The project may consist of a combination of review of research, a research project, or a research paper. Topics covered in this course are not offered in formal courses. This course may be repeated if a student has not earned the maximum of six semester hours. Limited to junior and senior mathematics majors and subject to the approval of the instructor and chair.
  
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    MAT 3391 - Mathematics Co-Op

    Credits: 3 hrs
    (See the course description for the Cooperative Education course number 3391 in the Undergraduate Catalog.)
  
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    MAT 3691 - Mathematics Co-Op

    Credits: 6 hrs
    (See the course description for the Cooperative Education course number 3691.)
  
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    MAT 4301 - Differential Equations I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course develops techniques for solving differential equations, presents theory to support those techniques, and includes applications of differential equations. The course includes the study of equations of order one, linear differential equations, nonhomogeneous equations, the Laplace transform, and systems of equations.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2318 .
  
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    MAT 4302 - Differential Equations II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course covers some methods for finding solutions of differential equations not considered in MAT 4301. It includes non-linear differential equations, power series solutions of differential equations, Fourier series, and an introduction to methods of solutions of partial differential equations of mathematical physics: heat and wave equations.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 4301   and MAT 3316 
  
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    MAT 4304 - History of Mathematics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a chronological study of the development of mathematics. It includes those mathematicians and periods in which the study of certain areas of mathematics prevailed.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
  
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    MAT 4311 - Real Variables I

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course presents the real numbers, least upper bound and greatest lower bound, sequences and series of real numbers, monotone and Cauchy sequences, limit superior and limit inferior, metric spaces, connected, complete and compact metric spaces, continuous functions on metric spaces, sequences and series of functions, and the three famous theorems— Weierstrass Approximation Theorem, Picard Existence Theorem, and the Ascoli-Arzela Theorem.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3317  
  
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    MAT 4312 - Topology

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course will cover operations on sets, properties of functions, topology of the real line, metric spaces, topological spaces, connectedness, compactness, and product and quotient spaces.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3317  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 4313 - Real Variables II

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course is a continuation of MAT 4311 , Real Variables I. This course extends the study to include the topology of Euclidean spaces, differentiability in Euclidean Spaces, and metric spaces. Sequences of functions, uniform convergence, convergence of series, and power series will also be covered.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 4311  
  
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    MAT 4315 - Advanced Calculus

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course presents differential and integral calculus of functions with domain and range in Euclidean n-space. Topics include geometry of n-space, sequences and series in n-space and of functions, uniform convergence, improper integrals with parameters, Fourier series, extrema, differentiation of transformations, implicit function theorems, transformations of multiple integrals, differential forms, and Green, Gauss, and Stokes Theorems in a general set up.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3317  
  
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    MAT 4318 - Topics In Biomathematics

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Course will explore topics in advanced Computational Biology. Topics will be based on recent developments. A course may be based on a full review and exposition of published works with possible extensions and open questions.
  
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    MAT 4330 - Directed Study Seminar

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Students may enroll for study of an area of mathematics not given in a formal course. Approval must be given by the department chair and the instructor. All parties must agree on the course format and content. This course is limited to senior mathematics majors.
  
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    MAT 4331 - Mathematical Modeling

    Credits: 3 hrs
    Mathematical model building in both discrete and continuous cases will be developed. A variety of mathematical problems in physical, biological, social, and behavioral sciences will be discussed. Specific problems will be given in applied dynamical systems, differential and integral equations and some statistical processes. In every topic, the emphasis will be on construction, interpretation, analysis, simulation, and testing of models.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 3316  , MAT 4301  , MAT 3310  , and CSC 1311 
  
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    MAT 4332 - Introduction to Statistical Methods

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course covers data analysis, sampling, probability, standard methods of statistical inference, including t-tests, chi-square tests, and nonparametric methods. Applications include the use of a statistical computer package.
    Pre-requisite(s): MAT 2317  
  
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    MAT 4333 - Methods of Regression/Analysis of Variance

    Credits: 3 hrs
    This course includes simple and multiple regression, model selection procedures, analysis of variance, simultaneous inference, and the design and analysis of experiments. Applications include the use of a statistical computer package.
 

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